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Load image into Gallery viewer, Stronghold Games Fields of Green Board Game
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Stronghold Games

Stronghold Games Fields of Green Board Game

4.8
Regular price
€82,00
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€82,00
Regular price
€134,00
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Save 39% (€52,00)
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  • Tracked Shipping on All Orders
  • 14 Days Returns

Description

  • Expand your farm
  • 2 to 4 players, ages 10 and up
  • Plays in 40 to 90 minutes

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Customer Reviews

What I like most (and least) about Fields of GreenSeveral weeks back, a friend of mine asked me to play a game he just got called Fields of Green. I m a big fan of card drafting games, so I was happy to give it a try. When we were done, I told him I d be happy to play it again any time. In fact, I liked it so much I decided to get a copy of my own. So, I thought I d put together a list of some of my favorite and least favorite things about the game based on my two plays so far (one four player and one two player).1. The main mechanic is card drafting, but here are also resource management (water, food, and money) and engine building components. For example, you need to make sure you have enough water for your fields, food for your livestock, and money to buy the cards you ll want later in the game. And, the cards you select and how you place them make up the engine that allows you to obtain and maximize these resources.2. On a related note, NOT managing your resources well has consequences. For example, if you cannot pay the harvest cost (usually water or food, but sometimes money) during the harvest phase, you have to turn a previously built card face down (it can be restored later on, but this usually comes with a noticeable opportunity cost). Or, if you don t have enough money to buy a card you want/need, you ll either have to sell that card for two money, or use it to buy a sub-optimal card instead.3. I love that you get to pick what TYPE of cards you ll be drafting (fields, livestock, constructions, or buildings). The actual cards you get are still random (i.e., they are randomly selected from the appropriate pile), but the TYPES or cards are not. This adds a nice strategic element to the game.4. There are lots of interesting decisions to make during the action phase. You can build the location you drafted, build a water tower or silo, go to the market to sell a card (and some food if you d like) to get money, and restore a location that has been turned face down.5. Equipment. Some cards allow you to acquire equipment, and equipment gives you all sorts of advantages either during or at the end of the game. When you get an equipment tile, you get to draw three and keep one (which adds another nice decision to the game). For example, they might extend the range of your water towers, automatically generate food during the upkeep phase, or allow you to purchase victory points at the end of the game, just to name a few. And, in the rare case you get an equipment you cannot use during the game, each unused equipment tile is worth one point at the end of the game.6. The two player rules. Playing with two players only requires two small changes to the game, and they work very well. Both changes affect how drafting works. That is, when the players are done selecting their six cards, they put them into a single pile and shuffle all 12 together. Then, you reveal six cards face up, and each player picks one. Then, you add two more face up cards and pick again. This continues until all 12 cards have been selected.So, are there any things I didn't like? I think there are a few of things worth mentioning.1. There are lots of opportunities for analysis paralysis. Examples include what cards you draft, where you place them, and what order you resolve them in during the harvest phase. This can make the game a noticeably longer than stated on the box. I expect this will diminish with experience playing the game (but it will likely be an ongoing problem whenever you include a new player).2. In a two player, the same player goes first for an entire round. So, not only do they get to pick first when the initial six cards are revealed, but they also get to pick first each time two new cards are revealed. So, whoever goes first has a noticeable advantage for an entire round. This evens out a bit given there are four rounds and each player will get to go first twice. But, it can still lead to some imbalance if there are much better cards in some rounds vs. others. On a more positive note, this can also add an interesting new strategy element to the game (i.e., if you need a certain type of card on a round where you are not picking first, you can select a lot more of that type of card during the upkeep phase to increase your chances of getting them).3. Not a ton of player interaction. The main way players interact is by drafting cards that others need (i.e., hate drafting ). To a lesser extent, they types of cards you select during the upkeep phase can also affect other players. But, that s really it (i.e., none of the cards in your field will influence other players; and vice versa). We still enjoyed the game quite a bit, but my hope is that future expansions increase player interaction.CONCLUSIONAll things considered, I found Fields of Green to be a very fun card drafting game, and I also liked that it includes resource management and engine builder components. If you like games with one or more of these mechanics (especially card drafting), I recommend giving Fields of Green a try. 4Pleasant surprise for what I thought was essentially a re-skinAmong the Stars is one of my favorite board games I own, and that's saying something, because I own a lot of games! I love the card drafting aspect of it (much akin to 7 Wonders), but I also like how you have to spatially organize your cards to make your engine work. I also love the Space theme of it, because that is one genre of games I don't have many of. When I heard about Fields of Green, I had mixed feelings. I thought it was essentially Among the Stars, but with a Farm theme. I knew I'd love the way the game played, but did I really need another game about farming? Nevertheless, I decided to give it a try, and I came to the conclusion, that while I don't need another game about farming, I did need a better game about farming, and this game fits that description. So apart from theme, what makes this game different from Among the Stars?1. There are four distinct stacks of cards - Buildings, Construction, Fields, and Livestock. At the beginning of each round, you and your opponents will determine how many cards and from which stacks you want to form your initial hand. This adds a layer of depth and strategy where you can hopefully get cards that benefit you more than your opponents, not leaving it to chance on what you might or might not get.2. Equipment tiles - These tiles are placed on cards in your farm, which allow you to customize your farm and "break the rules." For example, everyone else's Water Tower can only go a distance of two cards, but with equipment your Water Tower can no go a distance of three cards. This tiles won't solely win you the game, but they add a nice customization flavor that lets you tweak your farm enough to gain an edge.3. Upkeep Costs - There are some fields and livestock that require you to pay additional water or food each year. If you don't these cards are abandoned, so unlike Among the Stars where you paid the card cost and forgot about them, you must always be cognizant of your food and water supply in Fields of Green.Overall, I found this game to be a fun experience, and I would consider this a step up from Among the Stars in terms of difficulty. I still love the theme more in Among the Stars (and all the expansions that go with it), but I would now consider Among the Stars more of a gateway game. That's not a bad thing though, because there are some gateway games I will always play (Among the Stars being one of them). Fields of Green is a crunchier medium weight game with more strategy and planning involved. I look forward to the release of the expansion (Grand Fair) and hope that it is the first of many in this new world of farming to explore! 5FunFun game my husband and I have played over and over again. We love the mechanics of the game! 5Kicking some grassPretty fun game . Thumbs up. 5ExcellentFields of Green is an excellent card drafting game where the cards end up serving as tiles you lay down to build a farm. Many "euro" style games such as this often have themes that seem like an afterthought compared to the mechanics of the game, but Fields of Green really gives you the feeling of running a farm while still maintaining interesting and thought provoking play.As a disclaimer, I understand this is basically a re-theme of this designer's earlier game called Among The Stars..which as you can surmise from the title is about building a space station. I have never played that game, so I am unable to compare them and will speak solely on FOG.Players take turns drafting cards that they use to build up their farm. Cards come in four flavors: fields, livestock, constructions, and buildings. Fields give you food, which in turn can feed the livestock that brings the money to expand your farm. Constructions tend to help out your fields and livestock in different ways. Buildings don't really help your farm, but they produce end game victory points based on certain conditions. In this way, you generally start out building fields and livestock, then get constructions to help your production...finally, turning to buildings to help maximize points based on what you have on your farm. Of course, this is just a generalization. If you wish to build some buildings early and work your farm around that feel free, but you won't get anywhere without generating money from food, which comes from your fields!When building your farm you just don't place tiles willy-nilly. You must consider their placement carefully. At the end of every round there is a harvest phase. During harvest, fields require water and must be close to your water towers(within 2 spaces). You can't go crazy building fields because when it comes time to harvest you won't likely have the water they need. Likewise, you have to manage your food production in order to feed your livestock. Silos only hold four food, so as your farm progresses you will have to account for the extra food storage you will need. Furthermore, certain tiles benefit from being placed in special ways. For example, turkeys benefit most if they are further away from other livestock. I guess nobody wants to be around those poor, filthy, obnoxious, turkeys! Yet other livestock types will thrive with other like types...poultry livestock being near other poultry livestock, etc... This is especially true once you start adding constructions to the mix. To top it off, you can earn equipment tiles which can be placed on cards to give them extra benefits. These benefits could be ongoing, such as providing extra space in your silos for additional food or extended range for your water towers. They can be one use tiles that give you a special chance to break the rules. An example is the tile that lets you discard it in order to avoid paying the water/food cost to harvest a certain card. Or, they could contribute to end of game scoring conditions. When you gain equipment tiles you are allowed to pick 3 and choose 1, so it isn't just totally random.I should also mention I have only played this game as a 2 player game. While most card drafting games fall flat with 2 players, FOG implemented a neat mechanism that really makes the drafting work. Each player selects 6 building types from the four available. The 12 cards selected between the two players are shuffled and 6 are turned face up. After each player takes a turn drafting a card, two more are turned up until all 12 have been taken. That signals the end of a round.No matter the player count, at the end of each round is a harvest phase where the players collect whatever their cards provide, but they must be able to supply them the water or food they need. Otherwise the card is turned over, providing no resources. You can, however, revive the card by burning one of your chosen cards and paying a gold in a later round. Also, some cards are not harvested at the end of each round. These cards provide immediate effects when played. They might give you some food or money immediately instead of making you wait to harvest. This makes for some great decisions during the game as you weigh the benefits of taking a card that grants you some much needed resources right then and there vs. taking a card that will provide you with things throughout the game.There are a couple warnings I should give regarding this game, though they will not be applicable to all. First, you will need a decent amount of table space for this game. Once your farm starts expanding it can get pretty big. Not a problem if you have a large gaming table, but those who are gaming on smaller coffee tables should be aware. Second, the game can lead to some downtime between turns if you are playing someone who is prone to overthinking things. There can be a lot of thinking and planning ahead regarding how your going to use a card and how you're going to place it to produce in the harvest phase.Overall we've enjoyed this game a lot. There are tough decisions to make and you get that tension of not being able to do everything you need to do in order to satisfy the requirements of your farm. It's not as punishing as something like Agricola for those that have played that, but you will definitely find yourself having to really think about what you're doing during your turn and how you're going to get everything produced during the harvest phase.In sum, FOG is a very enjoyable game that really makes you feel like you're building a farm. The theme and mechanics go together wonderfully. It's simple enough to teach pretty quickly, but I wouldn't choose it as the first game you introduce to someone who isn't into these types of games. It isn't far off from that though. At the same time there is plenty here for those that are more into these types of modern board games. 5A brilliant drafting game themed on modern farmingEver since 7 Wonders popularized the drafting mechanic in modern board games, few drafting games have matched its success. But there is some strong competition from the game Among the Stars, by Greek designer Vangelis Bagiartakis and Artipia Games, which is often considered one of the best in this genre. In this popular sci-fi themed game, players draft cards over four rounds in order to build space stations in their quest for victory points. Now this game has had the benefit of a make-over with a new theme (modern 20th century farming), and under a new title: Fields of Green.In Fields of Green, players are now drafting cards to build farms in an effort to earn the most victory points, through careful management of water and food to expand their farms with fields, livestock, and buildings. The heart of the game is this drafting mechanism familiar from games like 7 Wonders, but unlike 7 Wonders, in Fields of Green players choose from four different types of cards to make up their initial hand for drafting, which gives more control and information. Fields of Green also adds a very important and meaningful spatial element to the placement of the cards that are drafted. There is an engine-building mechanic, which relies on a basic economy of resources: water, food, and victory points, and creates a real sense of development as you build up your farm, especially when you find ways to make these elements work together in synergy. Can you manage your resources carefully, maximize the cards available, and build the most successful farm?Fields of Green is a welcome follow-up to Among the Stars. It takes what was good about its predecessor, and by re-skinning the original game with a new theme that is tied even more closely and sensibly to the game mechanics, it enhances the game by making it even easier to learn and giving it a completely fresh feel. The elements of drafting and engine building come together very solidly, and offer interesting decisions, while not requiring a big investment of time in learning complex rules. Fields of Green is very accessible and easily explained, which is in part due to it having logical engine building mechanic that is tied closely to the theme. Yet within the context of a relatively straight-forward rule-set, there s lots of interesting and tough decisions to be made, including choices about which card to keep, what to activate, and what equipment to use. The result is a very pleasant game that is challenging, and yet not confrontational. There s also a variety of different strategies and paths to victory, with replayability ensured by the fact that different cards and combinations will be available from game to game. The fact that Fields of Green works so well as a two player game is especially a boon to many.There are a number of farming themed games on the market, but Fields of Green feels very fresh and different because it gives a modern take on this theme, while also applying it in a unique way to a drafting game. The drafting mechanic is a tried and true mechanic, but what sets it apart in this game is the fact that it is combined with the need to carefully place cards in an optimal spatial arrangement, and also build up a solid engine and economy, by optimizing the different abilities of your cards, and the resources of the game.Fields of Green is a very solid drafting game that feels fresh and fun, and I m very grateful to have come across it and to own a copy! Highly recommended! - BoardGameGeek reviewer EndersGame 5Where's The Fun/Purged From CollectionWow. I heard good things about this game and that it was an improvement of earlier outer-space version. We found it boring and uninteresting. Sold it at a loss and don't have any regrets getting rid of it. Purged. 5Pretty cool gamePretty cool game. Essentially 7 Wonders, except that it matters where you position the things you buy, so there's an additional strategic aspect to consider when drafting. 5
Stronghold Games Fields of Green Board Game

Stronghold Games Fields of Green Board Game

4.8
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
€82,00
Sale price
€82,00
Regular price
€134,00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (€52,00)